Resizing a VM

Prerequisite
Before starting, ask your Azure administrator to grant you access to the Contributor role so you can resize a VM.
You must stop a VM before you can change the VM size. You should resize only supported VM sizes as described in Teradata Database VM Sizes for Premium Storage.
Note
If you resize to unsupported VM sizes, database performance may be impacted. Data loss will occur if resizing local storage VM sizes.

Resizing has no affect on Teradata software that is running on a VM.

For additional information, see Azure Documentation Center and search for Resize virtual machines.

  1. Stop the database.
    # tpareset -x stop system
    It may take a few minutes to put the database in this state.
  2. Wait for the database to shut down.
    # psh pdestate -w
    PDE state: DOWN/HARDSTOP
  3. From the Azure portal, stop each VM until all VMs are stopped.
    Clicking Stop actually stops and deallocates only one VM. Ensure you stop each and every VM. For more information, see Stop, Deallocate, or Delete a VM in Azure.
  4. Resize the VMs.
    Before proceeding, check to ensure all VMs are stopped and deallocated.
    1. From the Azure portal, locate the Teradata Database resource group.
    2. Under the Settings pane, click Size, and choose a VM size.
      Select only supported VM sizes. Also select a VM that supports the amount of drives you have attached to your VM. You will get an error if you select a VM size that supports less drives.
    3. Repeat step b for all the VMs that were deallocated.
    4. Recheck to ensure all VMs have been resized.
  5. Start the VMs.
    Option Actions
    Using the Azure portal Use this option if you have a small number of VMs.
    1. From the Azure portal, locate the Teradata Database resource group.
    2. Locate the first VM, and click Start.
    3. Repeat step b until all VMs have been started.
    Using Azure CLI 2.0 Use this option if you have a large number of VMs. Before proceeding, install the Azure CLI 2.0.
    1. From the Azure CLI command prompt, enter the following:
      az vm start -n -rg
      where:
      • -n is the name of the Azure VM.
      • -rg is the name of the Azure resource group that contains the VM.
    2. Press Enter.
    3. Repeat steps a and b until all VMs have been started.
  6. Confirm your system is running.
    # psh pdestate -a
    If the PDE state shows RUN/STARTED on all VMs, you have successfully resized all VMs, and can skip the remaining steps.
    If the PDE state shows DOWN/HARDSTOP on any VM, continue to the next step.
  7. From the command line, identify and connect to any VM in a RUN/STARTED state.
    If there are no VMs in a RUN/STARTED state, contact Teradata Customer Support for assistance and skip the remaining steps.
  8. Using a combination of Vproc Manager and the command line, complete the following steps.
    For information on Vproc Manager, see Utilities.
    1. From Vproc Manager, type STATUS to identify any failed AMPs.
    2. Type the following to bring each AMP or a set of AMPs online:
      Set ### to ### online, where the first ### is the first AMP number and the second ### is the last AMP number. For example, set 0 to 10 online.
    3. Repeat step b for each AMP to bring it online.
    4. Type QUIT.
    5. From the command line, stop the database.
      # tpareset -x
      It may take a few minutes to put the database in this state.
    6. Verify the database is shut down.
      # psh pdestate -a
    7. Start the database again.
      # /etc/init.d/tpa start
    8. Verify the database has started.
      # psh pdestate -a
      The PDE state should show RUN/STARTED on all VMs. If it does not, proceed to step 8j.
    9. From Vproc Manager, type STATUS to verify all AMPs are ONLINE.
      All VMs have been successfully resized.
    10. If the PDE state shows DOWN/HARDSTOP, repeat the steps starting with step 8e.
      If the PDE still shows DOWN/HARDSTOP after performing this step, contact Teradata Customer Support for assistance.

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